Travel, Teach, Live in Europe and Middle East

Where To Go And What To See In Dublin, Ireland
By:Lek Boonlert

Ask anyone who has been there their opinion of Dublin, and it’s pretty likely that they will tell you that the place has something for everyone, that it’s a thriving and bustling capital city, but also that it doesn’t necessarily feel overpowering like some capital cities can. Dublin retains its charm and friendliness despite being as cosmopolitan and multicultural as all other large European cities these days, and a warm welcome at your Dublin hotel is never far away.

On top of the traditional warm Irish welcome that visitors to Dublin typically get, the city has absolutely loads to offer in the form of culture, history, music, food and drink – no mention of Dublin is complete without referencing Guinness, perhaps Ireland’s greatest gift to the world – and there are enough attractions here to keep a visitor occupied whether their stay is for 2 nights or 2 weeks.

Speaking of Guinness, considered one of the must-visit attractions in Dublin the Guinness Storehouse is not just something for fans of the black stuff. Since fist being brewed up in Ireland Guinness has become a worldwide phenomenon, so it is well worth spending half a day learning about the drink’s origins and recipe while those who remember the beer’s clever advertising campaigns from the 1960s onwards can enjoy a stroll down memory lane in the Guinness advertising exhibition. Fear not, for there is also a chance to taste the real stuff, the true Irish Guinness which is so markedly different from the export quality stuff which is drunk all over the world. A visit to the Guinness Storeroom can be topped off with a contemplative pint in the rooftop Gravity Bar, complete with its 360-degree views of downtown Dublin.

For fans of famous literature and Irish writing, there are some great attractions to take a look at in Dublin. Top of the list is the Dublin Writer’s Museum, where there are many works on show from Ireland’s most famous authors and poets, including works by Oscar Wilde, James Joyce and George Bernard Shaw. There are all kinds of insights to be found into the lives of the various writers and poets and the visitor will leave there feeling enriched and more knowledgeable than ever about some of the world’s best known and loved scribes.

If you can time a visit to Dublin right, and of course get your hands on a ticket, then you might want to try and take in a match at Croke Park. The stadium is at a capacity of more than 82,000 the third biggest in Europe and when full for a major Gaelic Football or Hurling match is a truly amazing experience. The atmosphere at Hurling and Football matches in the stadium is electric, and uniquely Irish. The stands bounce with energy and the sports themselves are different from those generally watched and attended in the UK, though they are not for the fainthearted – Hurling and Gaelic Football are two very physically demanding sports. You might not have a vested interest in one of the teams playing, but Croke Park offers one of the most amazing sporting experiences on the planet. Do though be aware that Dublin hotels can be at a premium around major sporting events.

The city offers something for all, and on top of all the great daytime attractions and things to do, there are of course Dublin’s famous nights out to be enjoyed too. After a hard day’s touristing there is nothing nicer than sitting back and having a chat in a pub with a few locals over a couple of pints of Guinness.

Lek Boonlert is an editor and content reviewer at DirectRooms and is responsible for all Dublin Hotels content. Visit Dublin Hotel for more info http://directrooms.com/europe-ireland/hotels/dublin-hotels/price1.htm.






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