Travel in Latin America

How to Get Immunizations Needed Before Traveling to Brazil
By:Collaborator

Brazil, the fifth largest country in the world, generally has high standards for public health. If you are traveling in the peak summer season, from November through March, expect it to be hot with a higher risk of insect-related illness. Of course, you will encounter fewer health risks lying on the miles of beaches than making your way through the jungles of the Amazon. Stay healthy during and after your trip by getting the recommended immunizations before traveling to Brazil.

Check the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Web site to obtain the most current list of recommended immunizations and to find out how far in advance the vaccination is needed. Hepatitis A is recommended for all travelers, except children under one year of age and pregnant women. The yellow fever vaccination is recommended for several areas in Brazil. Typhoid and rabies vaccinations may be necessary for extended trips or when there is a risk of exposure to these illnesses.

Make sure you are up-to-date on routine immunizations. Get the Mumps-Measles-Rubella (MMR) booster, unless pregnant, if you never received a second vaccination. Tetanus should be updated every 10 years. Individuals who risk exposure to Hepatitis B, as well as children who did not receive the series as infants, should receive this additional vaccination.

Find out the current yellow fever vaccination requirements and malaria situation for Brazil at the World Health Organization Web site. Yellow fever and malaria are both transmitted by mosquito bites. Yellow fever and malaria are risks in several parts of Brazil. Anti-malaria medication is recommended when traveling to infected areas.

Call your doctor at least two months in advance of your trip to make an appointment to receive the Hepatitis A and other routine immunizations at least four weeks before departure. If the yellow fever vaccination is required, schedule to receive it 10 days prior to your trip.

Visit your doctor to get the scheduled immunizations. An oral typhoid vaccine is available for travelers who are at least 6 years old, and an injection is approved for those over age 2. When traveling to a malaria-risk area, get an anti-malaria drug and start taking it before your trip as directed.






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