Travel, Teach, Live in Europe and Middle East

How To Teach Abroad in Europe
By:Collaborator

The process involved to teach abroad in Europe may seem daunting, confusing or overwhelming. However, by breaking this elephantine task into smaller, easy to handle steps, teaching abroad can be an easy and enjoyable experience to undertake.

Initial Decisions

There are many subjects one can teach abroad. Therefore, it is important that you spend some time thinking about which subjects you are most competent in, which you have the most experience in, and which you would like to teach.

Spend some time thinking about which countries you are interested in visiting as well. Europe is an enormous continent with myriad cultures, climates and opportunities. Taking the time to research each country thoroughly will help you create the experience you want.

Decide your primary goal for teaching abroad in Europe. Are you more interested in saving money or seeing new places? Do you want to learn the language of your host country or are you more concerned with spreading your knowledge of English? Do you want to work with young children or established adults?

Looking for Work

The Internet has hundreds of resources for people interested in teaching abroad, from bloggers already there to employers seeking out teachers. Simply typing "teaching abroad" and "Europe" into any search engine will yield a cornucopia of information.

The most common way teachers find jobs abroad is through freelance marketplaces. Either browse English-teaching marketplaces online or post advertisements, either online or in your prospective teaching location, to find work. Freelance jobs often pay more than alternatives, but are frequently shorter-term and are notoriously less reliable.

A second way to find jobs is through language schools. Often, schools that focus only on language-learning recruit teachers from English-speaking countries. Usually these schools require more experience from the teacher. For instance, they often want a teaching certificate such as a TESOL and some proof of prior experience. Language schools tend to offer more regular employment, more help for a teacher who is new to the country and more benefits. However, they often pay less and allow less flexibility than freelance jobs.

As with many other job fields, networking is essential to teach abroad. Knowing someone at a specific language school or in your desired country can be a valuable resource for finding jobs. Communicating with colleagues through online forums can also open a world of opportunity.

Initial Decisions

There are many subjects one can teach abroad. Therefore, it is important that you spend some time thinking about which subjects you are most competent in, which you have the most experience in, and which you would like to teach.

Spend some time thinking about which countries you are interested in visiting as well. Europe is an enormous continent with myriad cultures, climates and opportunities. Taking the time to research each country thoroughly will help you create the experience you want.

Decide your primary goal for teaching abroad in Europe. Are you more interested in saving money or seeing new places? Do you want to learn the language of your host country or are you more concerned with spreading your knowledge of English? Do you want to work with young children or established adults?

Looking for Work

The Internet has hundreds of resources for people interested in teaching abroad, from bloggers already there to employers seeking out teachers. Simply typing "teaching abroad" and "Europe" into any search engine will yield a cornucopia of information.

The most common way teachers find jobs abroad is through freelance marketplaces. Either browse English-teaching marketplaces online or post advertisements, either online or in your prospective teaching location, to find work. Freelance jobs often pay more than alternatives, but are frequently shorter-term and are notoriously less reliable.

A second way to find jobs is through language schools. Often, schools that focus only on language-learning recruit teachers from English-speaking countries. Usually these schools require more experience from the teacher. For instance, they often want a teaching certificate such as a TESOL and some proof of prior experience. Language schools tend to offer more regular employment, more help for a teacher who is new to the country and more benefits. However, they often pay less and allow less flexibility than freelance jobs.

As with many other job fields, networking is essential to teach abroad. Knowing someone at a specific language school or in your desired country can be a valuable resource for finding jobs. Communicating with colleagues through online forums can also open a world of opportunity.

Taking Off

Once you have secured a job, it is important to check the visa requirements of the specific country. This information can generally be obtained through the country's government website. Language schools generally provide assistance in obtaining a visa.

Check the vaccination requirements of your destination and make sure your medical records are up to date.

Many language schools provide housing for their teachers. Otherwise, housing can be found through local newspapers, on online sites such as Craigslist, or via a friend who already lives in the area.






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